African Research Journals: The Importance of African Content in Research

African Research Journals

Technology has allowed us to share information effortlessly and on a global scale. As a result, the planet’s population is moving ever closer to a universal knowledge-base. However, while the concept of universally shared and accepted knowledge is possible, it cannot exist (at least in the foreseeable future) because of a single factor; the individual knowledge of nations, such as that contained in African research journals.

Sarpong (2002) wrote that a people’s approach to knowledge and science (and the investigation thereof) cannot be removed from its history. African content is thus important in relation to research for the following reasons:

1. It Allows for Comprehensive Research

Even if the topic being researched stems from a foreign school of thought, African content is important for comprehensive research. The African literature on the topic might provide supporting or sometimes opposing evidence, making the research on the topic more complete. And, when it comes to research, it is often desirable to include other perspectives in order to validate the position of the research.

2. It Is Absolutely Relevant to African Studies

When it comes to researching African-centric topics, African content is invaluable, for obvious reasons. There is no better perspective on the topics relevant to African development than that portrayed in the literature and journal entries published in Africa by Africans.

3. It Portrays Development over Important Fields

Historical views on certain topics might not always be consistent with modern thinking, but they are always important when it comes to research. This is true for a number of reasons, but one definite advantage of historical literature is the fact that it can be used to portray development over certain fields, and present an accurate time-frame for that development.

Sabinet provides access to the African Journal Archive, which covers historical writings on a variety of topics, including politics, history, geology, education, law, medicine, botany, agriculture, and zoology.

Sabinet’s African ePublications

The African Journal Archive was sponsored by the Carnegie Corporation of New York in an effort to preserve the important literature of Africa and make it available for research projects. The result is a collection of journal articles covering the topics mentioned above, and dating back to 1906.

The African Journal Archive contains more than 182 African journals, incorporating over 150,000 articles, which are full-text and fully searchable through our information services.

To learn more about this service and how you might access it, be sure to contact Sabinet right away.

African Journal Archive content integrated into Sabinet Reference platform

The content of the African Journal Archive has been integrated with the Sabinet Reference platform (http://reference.sabinet.co.za).

It is now possible to search for information in this archive together with Sabinet’s South African and African electronic journals from a single search page (http://www.ajarchive.org). Users can also search for items contained in the archive separately from other online journal content.

The content is completely open access and the full text is available to anyone searching the archive – no subscription or registration is required.

Currently 49 of the 182 titles making up the archive have been loaded on the platform – the rest will follow in the very near future.

The African Journal Archive is a retrospective digitisation project of full-text journal articles published in Africa, in the Sciences, the Social Sciences and Humanities and was funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York. The archive provides access to a multi-disciplinary, multi-country digital archive of Africa’s research and cultural heritage contained in its journal literature with some articles dating back to 1902. For more information about the archive and the project, please go to http://www.ajarchive.org.

The inclusion of the African Journal Archive data on the Sabinet Reference platform means that the additional functionality provided by the platform can now also be used for the retrieval and storage of relevant information. This functionality includes: facets to facilitate the refining of search results; efficient keyword searching; relevance ranking; display of related items (items from other databases which contain the same search terms); an Action List, where selected records can be saved for a session from where printing, emailing or exporting can be carried out; mySabinet – each user’s personal space for saving searches or lists and sharing these with other mySabinet users; mobile access from smartphones or tablets. With the addition of these titles from the African Journal Archive, Sabinet is creating a resource containing more than 300 000 full-text articles from African journals.

Please contact Support at info@sabinet.co.za if you have any questions or experience any difficulties with accessing the archive.

The African Journal Archive supports Open Access Week 18-24 October 2010

The African Journal Archive is pleased to support Open Access week (18-24 October 2010).

The project is collecting journals published exclusively in Africa and about Africa, with a focus on the Sciences, Social Sciences and Humanities. The Archive contains issues digitised retrospectively back to the first issue. The journals are available free of charge on the African Journal Archive website at www.ajarchive.org.

The African Journal Archive provides a unique opportunity for universities and research organisations to digitise their journals free of charge back to the first issue. The digitised materials are then sent back to publishers for preservation and use on their own websites, further extending open access to African scholarship.

We invite African publishers to submit requests for inclusion as soon as possible to benefit from currently available funding. Any recommendations for new titles would also be appreciated.

Browse the Archive at http://content.ajarchive.org/index.php.

Sabinet supports Open Access Week 18-24 October 2010

Sabinet is proud to communicate its support for Open Access Week in 2010.

Sabinet’s Open Access Journal Collection currently consists of 46 predominantly Southern African journal titles. Users can search within these individual titles and immediate access to the PDF version of 8000+ full-text articles is provided.

Fourteen of the journals in the collection are accredited journals and appear on the DoE Approved South African Journals list, the ISI list or the IBSS list.

The journals in our Open Access Collection are also made available in the SA ePublications Full Collection as well as associated subject collections. Publishers who would like to make their journals available as Open Access titles are welcome to
contact us.

Also affiliated with Sabinet is the African Journal Archive.

This project is collecting journals published exclusively in Africa and about Africa, with a focus on the Sciences, Social Sciences and Humanities. The Archive contains issues digitised retrospectively back to the first issue. The journals are available free of charge on the African Journal Archive website at www.ajarchive.org.

The project provides a unique opportunity for universities and research organisations to digitise their journals free of charge back to the first issue. The digitised materials are then sent back to publishers for preservation and use on their own websites, further extending open access to African scholarship.

We invite African publishers to submit requests for inclusion as soon as possible to benefit from currently available funding. Any recommendations for new titles would also be appreciated.

Browse the Archive at http://content.ajarchive.org/index.php.