African Human Rights Publications and Journals

Gain Access to Scholarly Articles on African Human Rights

With over 500 scholarly and credible journal titles, specifically related to information about Africa or information originating in Africa, our online platform is one of the most comprehensive of its kind. With well over 350 000 full-text articles from peer-reviewed and recognised publishers, our platform is the perfect starting point to gain access to publications specifically related to African human rights.

Below is an introduction to some of the publications and article titles in our collection on the topic of African human rights.

South African Human Rights Yearbook

This annual reference book is published by the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies and produced, as well as distributed, by the Media & Publishing Unit. It contains reviews of legal issues and developments related to various areas of African human rights. The first publication was in 1990. Social, legal, and political developments and implications regarding the deregulation of apartheid and how it affected South African human rights form the focus of the publication. Legislation, commission findings, and legal precedents are covered. The areas of focus include, but are not limited to, children’s rights, education, environment, homelands, prisoner rights, policing, and women’s rights in South Africa.

African Human Rights Law Journal

The Pretoria University Law Press (PULP) publishes this bi-annual journal covering democratic practices and African human rights struggles. It also covers the institutions focused on addressing African human rights and developments in this field. Articles on topics ranging from corruption to child rights and the death penalty form part of the content. The peer-reviewed publication is a valuable source for academics and stakeholders doing research on aspects of human rights as relevant to South Africa.

ESR Review

This quarterly publication, published by the Dullah Omar Institute, focuses on topics related to economic and social rights, such as the right to have access to land, housing, healthcare services, food, water, education, and social security. It also covers topics such as environmental rights, children’s socio-economic rights, and aid to the poor in the country.

The above are only three of the many publications forming part of our collection dealing with important aspects of African human rights. Some of the full-text articles and other books on the topic, accessible through our platform, are briefly noted below, giving you an indication of the comprehensiveness and nature of our collection.

Conceptualising School Violence: A Human Rights Perspective

The article authored by Nirmala Gopal and Steven J. Collings with affiliation to the University of KwaZulu-Natal was published in Acta Criminologica: Southern African Journal of Criminology, Volume 30 Number 3, 2017, p.1-13. The article deals with the nature and extent of violence in schools with the argument put forward that the best way to deal with such is from a human rights perspective. The article provides a human rights based definition of violence and uses it in the development of a framework to conceptualise violence in schools. It also considers the human rights implications of such violence.

Socioeconomic and Political Development and Human Rights

Authored by N. Du Plessis, this article, which appeared in the Africanus, Volume 31, Issue 2, Jan 2001, p.61-77, argues that developing countries must be studied regarding their sufficiency to their own reality. The argument is put forth that the correlation between development and rights should be fully understood.

African AIDS and Human Rights

Written by Raymond Downing and published in African Renaissance, Volume 2, Issue 5, Sep 2005, p.97-101, the article discusses the issue of what the connection between African Aids and human rights is by posing three questions and providing qualified answers to them in an attempt to broaden the awareness of the relation between African AIDS and human rights.

Women’s Rights Are Human Rights

S. Matthews addresses the relation between women’s rights and human rights in the article published in Conflict Trends, Volume 2001, Issue 2, Jan 2001, p.44-49. The author looks at the subdivision of human rights and the fact that by declaring that all people have rights because they are human, all aspects of human life can be bettered.

The above are only a few of the topics covered that are relevant to African human rights. Use our search facility to find related publications and articles.